The women in my grandfather’s village, Gao Gong, would spin the cocoons of silk worms. Worms’ homes unraveling by a thread until they tumbled out into a large rattan basket. There, their bodies rolled under the heat of the sun, baking them to be eaten later.

The women in my grandfather’s village, Gao Gong, would spin the cocoons of silk worms. Worms’ homes unraveling by a thread until they tumbled out into a large rattan basket. There, their bodies rolled under the heat of the sun, baking them to be eaten later.

Ella is a Chinese-Nicaraguan writer exploring her family allegory and the similarities between dying and being born.

She has an MFA in creative nonfiction from Sarah Lawrence College and an MSc in fiction and poetry from The University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Her work has appeared in Glimmer Train, Under Water New York, and elsewhere online. She's a three-time attendee of the Tin House Writer's Workshop.

Ella is a director of content strategy at a technology company. She supports teams who use language, information, and storytelling to build stronger products.

Ella has many gifts as a poet, and a real sensuous and lyric feeling for language. She is altogether a gratifying presence.
— Vijay Seshadri, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, 2014